Stop 6 – The Old Rectory

Rectors-Moor

The area between the High Street and Mill Lane was the land around the Rectory.  Because the Rector of Welwyn was Lord of the Manor, this was the Manor House until a new Rectory was built in the 1830s.  The Manor House had a moat, which was filled in during the 19th century.

The Old Rectory

The Old Rectory, or Manor House, was built around 1450.  It was extended and the sash windows were added about 1800.

Ebenezer Baptist Chapel

Dated 1834, the Baptist Chapel is a Grade II listed building.

New-Stop-6

 

The Assembly Rooms

Dr. Edward Young, Rector of Welwyn and a well-known 18th century poet, wanted to promote Welwyn as a spa with medicinal waters from a spring on Mill Lane.  He built these Assembly Rooms for concerts and balls.  You can still see the large windows (now mostly bricked over) that provided light to the single-storey interior.

The Mill

Mill Lane was once a cul-de-sac called “Back Lane”, that ended at the Mill.  The mill was mentioned in the Domesday Book (108).  The brick front dates to the early 18th century, but parts of the building are much older, with brickwork from the 16th century.

The River Mimram near the Mill. Collection of the Welwyn Archaeological Society

The River Mimram near the Mill.
Collection of the Welwyn Archaeological Society

The Old Exchange

The Old Exchange was built as a tailor’s workshop.  It eventually served as the village’s telephone exchange.

The White Horse

There has been a pub here since at least 1742.  Note the multiple changes and renovations evident in the timber framing on the gable end of the building.

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